For Families In Panic Or Calm, Dealing With Kids Sick Or Well

Prevent Child Injury at Home with These Safety Projects

More than 3.4 million children are unintentionally injured at home every year,” warns home improvement site, HomeAdvisor. No parent likes to see their little one hurt, but when you’re raising a child with autism, injury prevention is all the more so important. Mother and baby submerged underwater

According to research published in the American Journal of Public Health, children and adolescents with autism are 40 “More than 3.4 million children are unintentionally injured at home every year,” warns home improvement site, HomeAdvisor. No parent likes to see their little one hurt, but when you’re raising a child with autism, injury prevention is all the more so important.

According to research published in the American Journal of Public Health, children and adolescents with autism are 40 times more likely than the general child population to die from preventable injuries including poisoning, suffocation, asphyxiation and drowning. While a big part of preventing these injuries includes education and supervision, parents can also reinforce safety with home modifications. These helpful ideas and projects can add security to the homes and reduce the chances of childhood injury and death.

Lock it Up

Children are naturally curious. They want to explore the world around them and experience things for themselves. However, if the world they want to explore includes kitchen cabinets and what they want to experience is the taste of cleaning supplies that can present a major problem. Install locks, safety latches or magnetic elbow catches to cupboards and drawers that can easily be accessed by children, especially if they contain hazardous chemicals. And, of course, always put supplies back into the cupboard once they are no longer of use.

Child-proof locks should also be used on windows, especially in rooms where children may play unsupervised. Look for locks that restrict a window from opening any more than 4 inches. This will give kids some agency and allows them to use windows for their intended purpose– to let fresh air inside– without putting them at risk for falling outside of them.

Get Creative with Window Treatments

Generally, parents are advised to cut and tie up window blind cords so they are out of a child’s reach. Instead of committing to wrestling with tangles and knots for the next 18 years, why not update window treatments with something cool and cordless? You can maintain your home’s privacy and cover windows with cool alternatives such as privacy curtains, window film, indoor shutters, wood panels, cordless Roman shades, or even stained glass. Not only will your home be safer, but also it will look more modern and unique compared to homes with boring old Venetian blinds.

Essential Pool Safety

Drowning accidents make up 46 percent of all injury deaths among children with autism, making them 160 times more at risk of dying from drowning compared to other children. If your home has a pool, you have to install a gate around it that prevents children from being able to enter the pool area without proper supervision. The fence should be at least 4 feet tall with its own self-closing and self-latching gate. Many parents like the look of mesh pool safety fences that can easily be removed and stored elsewhere when entertaining.

Beyond a fence, using a cover when the pool is not in use doesn’t just keep kids safe, it also prevents dirt and debris from falling into the water, which means less cleaning and maintenance.

A fence and cover for the pool are helpful for preventing drowning when the pool is not in use and children are unsupervised, but these accidents are just as likely to happen when kids are already swimming. Because of this, it’s important to go over swim-safety rules with adults and children alike. Have these pool rules posted in or around the swimming area so they are crystal clear.

Adults should always supervise children when swimming or playing in the pool. Never turn your back on children when they are in the water. Babies and toddlers should always be within arm’s reach of an adult.

Always listen to the lifeguard. Have a designated adult serve as lifeguard if there is not one on duty.

No running around the pool area. Always walk and be aware of those around you.

No dunking or roughhousing allowed when in the water.

Children who cannot tread water and swim safely without them need to use water wings, a life jacket, or some other type of floatation device when in the pool.

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Children with autism are more likely to die from preventable injuries than children living without the disorder. To protect your family, add extra security on top of educating little ones about important safety rules. Locks on cupboards and windows can prevent injuries like poisoning, asphyxiation and falls. Instead of tying up window blinds cords, replace the mini blinds altogether with a safer alternative. Finally, drowning is the most common preventable injury from which children with autism die. A security fence and pool cover can help prevent drowning when the pool is not in use, but it’s equally important to establish crystal clear rules that prevent it when kids are swimming.

Danny Knight, fixitdads.com

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